municipal

As cities and nations around the world begin to test the “smart city” concept, demand for municipal video surveillance systems is expected to grow.

A smart city is an urban development model that securely integrates several information and communication technologies and the internet of things to manage a city’s assets, including city government and its information systems, schools, hospitals, libraries, utilities, law enforcement and other community services.

Although North America lags behind other parts of the world in the smart city movement, the U.S. is investing $165 million in developing smart city applications.[1] Atlanta is participating in a pilot program with the Smart City Forum, a global initiative of city leaders and chief information officers, and other cities.[2]

Citywide video surveillance systems are a major component of the smart city concept, driven by concerns over terrorism, public safety and emergency management. Municipal video surveillance systems aim to discourage crime, provide visual information in emergency situations, document evidence for legal actions, and give city residents greater peace of mind.[3] Market research firm IHS projects global sales of municipal electronic security equipment will exceed $3.2 billion in 2017.[4]

Beyond their use as a crime deterrent, many U.S. cities are looking to install integrated video surveillance systems to monitor critical infrastructure, public utilities, transportation systems, hospitals, schools and public meeting venues. City governments are forming public-private partnerships with the business community to plan and develop city surveillance deployment programs and fund the purchase of video equipment.[5]

Some citizens worry about privacy issues related to the installation of municipal security cameras. To address these concerns, many cities are working with privacy experts and being transparent in their communications with residents about the type of technology and devices being installed.[6] Public-private partnerships, a willingness to share video resources and analytics, and engaging the community in discussions about public safety initiatives are recommended to ease the transition to increased video surveillance.[7]

[1] “The U.S. is investing $165 million in smart city solutions,” Business Insider, Oct. 15, 2016. Available at: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-us-is-investing-165-million-into-smart-city-solutions-2016-10

[2] “The Future of Smart Cities,” Security Camera Expert blog, Feb. 24, 2016. Available at: http://www.securitycamexpert.com/blog/2016/02/the-future-of-smart-cities/

[3] “8 Steps to Join the Safe Cities Movement,” by Erin Harrington, Security Sales blog, Dec. 8, 2016. Available at: http://www.securitysales.com/article/8_steps_join_safe_cities_movement_contracts#

[4] “5 Best Practices for Video Surveillance in Municipalities,” by Tom Dodrill, Security Today blog, Nov. 25, 2016. Available at: https://securitytoday.com/articles/2016/11/21/5-best-practices-for-video-surveillance-in-municipalities.aspx

[5] “5 Best Practices for Video Surveillance in Municipalities,” by Tom Dodrill, Security Today blog, Nov. 25, 2016. Available at: https://securitytoday.com/articles/2016/11/21/5-best-practices-for-video-surveillance-in-municipalities.aspx

[6] “The Future of Smart Cities,” Security Camera Expert blog, Feb. 24, 2016. Available at: http://www.securitycamexpert.com/blog/2016/02/the-future-of-smart-cities/

[7] “5 Best Practices for Video Surveillance in Municipalities,” by Tom Dodrill, Security Today blog, Nov. 25, 2016. Available at: https://securitytoday.com/articles/2016/11/21/5-best-practices-for-video-surveillance-in-municipalities.aspx